At one last reunion, veterans of La Raza Unida political movement pass along their torch

“No m?s”

Jos? Angel Guti?rrez, co-founder of La Raza Unida and former president, grew up in Crystal City. By the start of the 1970 school year, nearly 40% of Crystal City teachers were Mexican Americans.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

Martha Cotera, co-founder of La Raza Unida, works as a librarian at the Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas at Austin.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

Luz Baz?n Guti?rrez, co-founder of La Raza Unida, grew up in South Texas and as a teacher saw the unequal tracks on which poor Mexican American students and white students were often placed.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

In search of democracy

Rosie Castro ran for San Antonio City Council in 1971.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

Audience members listen to a panel moderated by Rosie Castro during the 50th anniversary reunion of La Raza Unida Party in San Antonio on Thursday.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

First: La Raza Unida memorabilia, including a photo of Rosie Castro when she was a 23-year-old candidate for San Antonio City Council in 1971, is on display during the 50th anniversary reunion of the party in San Antonio on Thursday. Last: Rosie Castro moderates a panel during the reunion.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

The struggle continues

Henry Flores, a retired law professor at St. Mary’s University who worked behind the scenes as a data cruncher for the party, grew up on the west side of San Antonio.

Credit:
Eddie Gaspar/The Texas Tribune

 

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