Disney Remakes ‘What About Bob’ in Real Life, Replaces CEO Chapek With Predecessor Iger

That sound you are hearing is Disney fans across the land rejoicing. The Walt Disney Company has announced that CEO Bob Chapek has been replaced, effective immediately, with former CEO Bob Iger.

The announcement came on Sunday, November 20th. When a major corporation makes such a move on a weekend, you know it wanted the now-former CEO out of there right now.

From Business Insider via MSN:

Disney said in the release that Iger has agreed to serve as the company’s CEO for two years, during which he will work with the Board to find a successor.

“The Board has concluded that as Disney embarks on an increasingly complex period of industry transformation, Bob Iger is uniquely situated to lead the Company through this pivotal period,” said Susan Arnold, Disney board chairman, in the company’s press release.

Chapek’s brief tenure had Disney going increasingly woke and demonstrating an utter failure to take care of the existing theme park fan base. A quick glance at the numerous articles here concerning Disney reveals three common themes: abandonment of storytelling in favor of woke agenda, the dramatic deterioration of quality at theme parks, and a corresponding decrease in revenue despite ridiculous price increases on both the online and park attendee levels. One suspects the latter is Disney’s primary prompt for showing Chapek the door, but perhaps with Iger back in charge, Disney will address the first two issues as they are the reason for the third.

Under Chapek’s reign, Disney’s open disrespect for its most loyal customers, namely theme park annual passholders (note: for Disneyland, the passes are called Magic Key), was expressed in August 2022, when it openly complained it would make more money if not for … wait for it … its best customers.

But there was a caveat. The profits would have been more, the report stated, but for those earnings being “partially offset by an unfavorable attendance mix at Disneyland Resort.”

Translation: There were too many annual passholders at the parks versus single-day ticket purchasers, so profits weren’t as high at Disneyland as they could have been.

Several Magic Key holders took to wearing “Unfavorable Attendance Mix” shirts and variations thereof on all future park visits.

Another flashpoint for Disneyphiles is how, depending on which tier the pass is, the Magic Key system blocks out multiple days from passholders attending while regular ticket purchasers can reserve most any day desired on which to pay … er, play in the park. As the parks slowly reopened following the panicdemic, Disney instituted a two-tier process for park entry. First, you had to have a ticket or pass. Only then could you attempt to make a reservation for any given day or days. The given reason was to maintain park attendance at a sufficiently low level to slow the spread. As attendees in recent weeks testify, this has gone out the window in favor of cramming as many people as possible into the park, resulting in a far less than satisfactory guest experience. Iger will hopefully address this, along with the increasing frequency of rides going offline and a deterioration in park cleanliness, as swiftly as possible.

Welcome back, Bob Iger. As to the other Bob, don’t let the door hit you on the way out.

 

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