Florida Contradicts the Cult, Tells Younger Men Not to Get the mRNA Vaccines

In a move sure to set hair aflame, Florida’s Surgeon General, Dr. Joseph A. Ladapo, has recommended against men aged 18-39 getting the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines. That decision was made after the results of a study showed an 84 percent increase in cardiac-related deaths within the first 28 days of getting the shot.

Ladapo issued a statement on Saturday, garnering mixed reactions.

The study was carried out over nearly two years, running from December 2020 to June 2022 (click here for the full study). As far as the topline result, what it found was that cardiac-related deaths rose from 0.006 to 0.01 percent in the target group. That may not sound like a lot, but you have to compare that against the risk of death from COVID-19 in the same age group (which is almost non-existent) in order to ascertain whether getting the mRNA vaccines makes sense or not. Higher COVID-19 death rates among older populations change the calculation.

Those who already had COVID-19 or died of COVID-19 were excluded from the study to avoid biasing the results. Each individual was given a 25-week surveillance period after receiving the vaccine to observe possible adverse events. As other studies have shown, younger men are most at risk for complications.

Unfortunately, despite the study’s finding, following the “science” only applies to the “science” that fits a predominant narrative, so you can expect anger to result from Ladapo’s decision. Still, his strategy of using real data beats the CDC’s strategy of just hoping everything will be fine in order to keep pushing the vaccines at all costs. You can go to the CDC’s website right now and find that they admit these cardiac events are a problem, yet they still recommend indiscriminate vaccination for those as young as 6 months old.

The COVID-19 vaccines should not have a cult following. They should be used when the data says they should be used. Kudos to Ladapo for going against the “consensus” and being willing to make tough recommendations, even if they go against the grain.

 

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