Why the LCRA power plant being built in Caldwell County isn’t like other plants

MAXWELL, Texas (KXAN) —On Friday, the Lower Colorado River Authority announced it was building a peaker power plant in Caldwell County set to be operational by 2025.

According to a release from the LCRA, the plant will run on natural gas and would only be used when the need for energy surpasses what renewables could provide.

The site spans more than 51 acres in Maxwell, near Church Street and Highway 142, and will be able to produce 190 megawatts – enough to power 38,000 homes.

“The new plant furthers our commitment to providing power to Texans. Thousands of people are moving to our state every week, and I’m proud LCRA is continuing to develop new sources of power to help support our state’s dynamic growth,” said LCRA General Manager Phil Wilson.

Currently, large power poles and signs mark the plot as belonging to the LCRA.

Siblings Domingo Salinas and Janie Cruz live near the building site in homes they built from the ground up back in the 1980s.

Both said they only became aware of the incoming plant after noticing their neighbor was moving homes.

That neighbor, Salinas said, sold his property to the LCRA where it is now building its new plant.

Now the siblings, who live on their property with several other family members, said they are worried developers may try to buy their land as development in Maxwell continues.

“We don’t plan on leaving but we don’t know what’s going to happen actually,” Cruz said.

 

MAXWELL, Texas (KXAN) —On Friday, the Lower Colorado River Authority announced it was building a peaker power plant in Caldwell County set to be operational by 2025.

According to a release from the LCRA, the plant will run on natural gas and would only be used when the need for energy surpasses what renewables could provide.

The site spans more than 51 acres in Maxwell, near Church Street and Highway 142, and will be able to produce 190 megawatts – enough to power 38,000 homes.

“The new plant furthers our commitment to providing power to Texans. Thousands of people are moving to our state every week, and I’m proud LCRA is continuing to develop new sources of power to help support our state’s dynamic growth,” said LCRA General Manager Phil Wilson.

Currently, large power poles and signs mark the plot as belonging to the LCRA.

Siblings Domingo Salinas and Janie Cruz live near the building site in homes they built from the ground up back in the 1980s.

Both said they only became aware of the incoming plant after noticing their neighbor was moving homes.

That neighbor, Salinas said, sold his property to the LCRA where it is now building its new plant.

Now the siblings, who live on their property with several other family members, said they are worried developers may try to buy their land as development in Maxwell continues.

“We don’t plan on leaving but we don’t know what’s going to happen actually,” Cruz said.

Copyright 2023 Nexstar Media Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

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